At Swartz & Swartz P.C., we know that workplace accidents and fatalities happen and that some industries are more dangerous than others.

At Swartz & Swartz P.C., we know that workplace accidents and fatalities happen and that some industries are more dangerous than others. If your skeptical consider this: a worker died every 99 minutes from a work-related injury in 2019.

That’s why employment laws and labor standards are so important, and why our workplace injury team of attorneys and lawyers is so passionate about what they do. In today’s blog post we will examine the most recent U.S. workplace fatality statistics as reported by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and take a quick look at the history of employment safety law.

President Richard Nixon signed the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act into law in 1970. Nixon said that the law was meant to ensure “so far as possible every working man and woman in the nation safe and healthful working conditions and to preserve our human resources.” In turn, the OSH Act authorized the Secretary of Labor to “develop and maintain an effective program of collection, compilation, and analysis of occupational safety and health statistics.” To make a long story short, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) collects and publishes workplace statistics every year, including workplace fatalities, and has done so since the first Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII) was used in 1972.

According to the National Census of Fatal Occupational injuries, which uses data collected from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI), in 2019, there were 5,333 fatal work injuries recorded in the U.S. This is a 2% increase from the 5,250 fatalities reported in 2018. The fatal work injury rate was 3.5 fatalities per 100,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) workers, the same rate reported in 2018.

According to the National Census of Fatal Occupational injuries, which uses data collected from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI), in 2019, there were 5,333 fatal work injuries recorded in the U.S.

The ten industries with the most fatalities per year are as follows:

  1. Fishing and hunting workers: 145% (or 145 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers)
  2. Logging workers: 68.9% (or 68.9 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers)
  3. Aircraft pilots and flight engineers: 61.8% (or 61.8 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers)
  4. Roofers: 54.0% (or 54 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers)
  5. Helpers, construction trades: 40.0% (or 40 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers)
  6. Refuse (garbage) and recyclable material collectors: 35.2% (or 35.2 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers)
  7. Driver/sales workers and truck drivers: 26.8% (or 26.8 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers)
  8. Structural iron and steel workers: 26.3% (or 26.3 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers)
  9. Farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural managers: 23.2% (or 23.2 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers)
  10. Grounds maintenance workers: 19.8%. (or 19.8 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers)

No matter in what industry you work, you deserve a safe and healthy work environment. If you or someone you love has been injured or killed on the job our Swartz & Swartz team is here for you. We will fight for your rights no matter where you work or what you do. Call the Boston, Massachusetts office of Swartz & Swartz, P.C. at (617) 742-1900, or toll-free at 1-800-545-3732.

Get Legal Help Now

Work Injury Services

 

James Swartz, our Managing and Principal Attorney at Swartz & Swartz P.C., is a nationally recognized and respected trial attorney as well as consumer advocate. His practice focuses on cases involving negligence, torts, products liability, medical malpractice, wrongful death, and other claims involving catastrophic injuries.

 

 

Need Help?

If you or someone you know, needs help from a lawyer, contact the law offices of Swartz & Swartz, use our live chat, or send us a message using the form below and we’ll get in touch to assess your case and how we can help.

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.